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Baddha konasan

Baddha konasan

Baddha konasana is a basic seated asana that opens the hips and the muscles of the groin. The term comes from the Sanskrit baddha, meaning ‘bound,’ kona, meaning ‘angle’ and asana, meaning ‘pose’ or ‘posture.’
To enter the pose, sit with the back straight, directly on the sit bones of the buttocks. Bend the knees, bringing the feet together in front of the body with the toes, arches and heels pressed against each other while the hands remain on the feet. Keeping the feet together, bring the heels as close to the groin area as comfortable. Enjoy deep breaths in this pose for as long as needed. Individuals can also practice the pose by gently bouncing the legs up and down like butterfly wings, or by tilting the upper body forward at the hips, keeping a straight spine, to increase the stretch.

Instructions:

Sit on a bolster at right. angles to your body. Place a block on either side of your hips. Sit in Dandasana. Bend your knees and join both soles together. Pull your heels closer to the bolster. Beginners may find it easier to use a bolster positioned parallel to the hips

Push your knees away from each other and then gradually onto the blocks. Take your hands behind your back and press your fingertips on the bolster. Open your chest and draw-in the abdomen. Initially, hold the pose for 1 minute. Gradually increase the duration of the asana to 5 minutes.

Adho Mukha Svanasana

Adho Mukha Svanasana

Adho mukha svanasana is a foundational yoga asana that requires flexibility and upper body strength. In this asana, the body forms an inverted ‘V’ with the feet and hands pressing into the ground and the hips pushing to the sky. As well as a range of physical benefits, it is believed to calm the mind, yet energize and rejuvenate the body. The name comes from the Sanskrit adhas, meaning ‘down,’ mukha, meaning ‘face,’ svana, meaning ‘dog,’ and asana, meaning ‘pose.’

Instructions

1. Lie full length on the floor on the stomach, face downwards. The feet should be kept one foot apart.
2. Rest the palms by the side of the chest, the fingers straight and pointing in the direction of the head.
3. Exhale and raise the trunk from the floor. Straighten the arms, move the head inwards towards the feet and place the crown of the head on the floor, keeping the elbows straight and extending the back.
4. Keep the legs firm do not bend the knees but press the heels down. The heels and soles of the feet should rest completely on the floor, while the feet should be parallel to each other, the toes pointing straight ahead.
5. Stay in the pose for about a 1/2 minute with deep breathing. Then with an exhalation lift the head off the floor, stretch the trunk forward and lower the body gently to the floor and relax.

Ardha Uttanasana

Ardha Uttanasana

Ardha uttanasana is a standing forward fold that relaxes and restores the body and mind. In spiritual practice, this pose stimulates the third eye chakra and opens the heart.

In this asana, the practitioner folds forward at the hips from a standing position, then lifts the head and heart, gently pressing them outward. To increase the heart-opening benefits of this asana, it can be practiced with the hands on a wall.

Instructions

Coming soon

Bhujangasan

Bhujangasan

Bhujangasana is a gentle backbend practiced from a face-down position that warms and strengthens the spine while opening the chest. The term comes from the Sanskrit bhujanga, meaning ‘serpent’ or ‘snake,’ and asana, meaning ‘posture’ or ‘seat.

To enter the pose, lie down on the stomach with legs stretched out behind and the tops of the feet on the ground, with toes pointed. Feet and legs can be slightly spread apart, about the same distance if one was standing naturally. Place the hands directly under the shoulders with palms pressing against the ground and fingers pointing forward; arms and elbows are held tight against the sides. Press the tops of the feet, legs and pubic bone into the ground to support the lower body and lift the head, shoulders and chest off the floor, keeping the navel towards the spine, the pubic bone on the floor, and the bottom of the ribs and abdomen on the floor. Slowly and gently arch the back, lifting the chest upward, keeping the shoulders down the back away from the ears and neck. To come out of the pose, slowly lower your shoulders, chest, and abdomen down towards the floor.

Instructions

1. Lie on the floor face downwards. Extend the legs, keeping the feet apart. Keep the knees tight and the toes pointing.
2. Rest the palms by the side of the pelvic region.
3. Inhale, press the palms firmly on the floor and pull the trunk up.
4· Inhale, lift the body up from the trunk until the pubis is in contact with the floor and stay in this position with the weight on the legs and palms.
5· Contract the buttocks, tighten the thighs.
6. Maintain the pose for about 20 seconds, breathing normally.
7· Exhale, bend the elbows and rest the trunk on the floor. Repeat the pose two or three times and then relax.

Dhanurasan

Dhanurasan

Dhanurasana is a backbend that deeply opens the chest and the front of the body. The name comes from the Sanskrit dhanu, meaning ‘bow,’ and asana, meaning ‘pose.’

In this asana, the practitioner lies flat on the stomach and bends the knees. Then the arms reach back to grab the ankles. The back arches and the thighs lift off of the floor as the chest pushes forward, bending the body to resemble a bow.

Instructions

1. Lie full length on the floor on the stomach, face downwards.
2. Exhale and bend the knees. Stretch the arms back and hold the left ankle with the left hand and the right ankle with the right hand. Take two breaths.
3. exhale completely and pull the legs up by raising the knees above the floor, and simultaneously lift the chest off the floor. The arms and hands act like a bow-string.
4. Lift up the head and pull it as far back as possible. Do not rest either the ribs or the pelvic bones on the floor. Only the abdomen bears the weight of the body on the floor.
5. While raising the legs do not join them at the knees, for then the legs will not be lifted high enough.
6. Since the abdomen is extended, the breathing will be fast. Stay in the pose to your capacity from 20 seconds to one minute.
7. Then, with an exhalation, release the ankles, stretch the legs straight, bring the head and the legs back to the floor and relax.

Jaanu Sheershasan

Jaanu Sheershasan

Janu sirsasana is a series of asymmetrical seated forward bends. From Sanskrit, janu means ‘knee,’ sirsa means ‘head’ and asana means ‘pose.’ The intention of the pose is to fold the body so that the head moves closer to the knee. In the full expression of the posture, though, once the hamstrings and back of the body are open enough, the head will actually move beyond the knee and to the shin.

Instructions

1. Sit on the floor, with legs stretched straight in front.
2. Bend the left knee and move it to the left, keeping the outer side of left thigh and the left calf on the floor.
3. Place the left heel against the inner side of the left thigh near the perineum. The big toe of the left foot should touch the inner side of the right thigh. The angle between the two legs should be obtuse. Do not keep the left knee in line with the left thigh at a right angle to the extended right leg. Try and push the left knee as far back as possible, so that the body is stretched from the bent leg.
4. Extend the arms forward towards the right foot and hold it with the hands. First catch the toes ofthe right foot, then gradually catch the sole, then the heel and finally extend the arms and catch the wrist of one hand with the other, beyond the outstretched foot.
5. Keep the right leg stretched throughout by tightening the knee. See that the back of the right knee rests on the floor.
6. Exhale,move the trunk forward by bending and widening the elbows, and rest first the forehead, then the nose, then the lips and lastly the chin beyond the right knee. Do not allow the leg to tilt.

Makarasan

Makarasan

Makarasana is a reclined yoga asana that relaxes the body, stimulates the sacral chakra, and can even be used for meditation or pranayama. The name comes from the Sanskrit makar, meaning ‘crocodile,’ and asana, meaning ‘pose.’

To perform this asana, the yogi lies face down with the hands folded under the head. The palms can be placed under the chin, on the shoulders, or flat on the ground. The legs stretch out as far as possible, with the toes pointing forward. The whole body should stay relaxed.

Instructions

1. Lie on the ground face down, the chest touching the earth and both legs stretched out: catch the head with the arms.
2. Stay in the pose as long as you can with even breathing.
3. Release the arms, exhale, take the head and the chest down and relax.

Paadahastasan

Paadahastasan

Padahastasana is a standing forward fold and one of the 12 basic postures of Hatha yoga. It is also the third pose of surya namaskar. It is believed to reduce tamas, which means heaviness or inertia in the body. This pose’s name comes from the Sanskrit pada which means ‘foot,’ hasta meaning ‘hand’ and asana meaning a ‘seat’ or ‘posture’.

Instructions

1. Stand in Tadasana. Spread the legs a foot apart.
2. Exhale, bend forward and without bending the legs at the knees insert the hands under the feet so that the palms touch the soles.
3. Keep the head up and make the back as concave as possible. Do not slacken the grip at the knees and take a few breaths in this position.
4. Now exhale, and move the head in between the knees by bending the elbows and pulling the feet up from the palms. Stay in the pose for about 20 seconds with normal breathing.
5. Inhale, raise the head and come back, with the head well up. Take two breaths.
6. Inhale, stand up and return to Tadasana.

Parshvakonasan

Parshvakonasan

Utthita parsvakonasana is a standing side stretch. The name comes from the Sanskrit, utthita, meaning “extended,” parsva, meaning “side” or “flank,” kona, meaning “angle,” and asana, meaning “posture.”
This variation of the standing side-stretch yoga asana that requires balance and flexibility with the legs in virabhadrasana (lead leg flexed at a 90-degree angle and the back leg straight); the lead arm rests on the lead leg or reaches to the ground, while the other arm extends overhead and forward, stretching the side of the body. The pose offers a range of physical benefits, but is also believed to relieve mental and emotional stress.

Instructions

1. Stand in Tadasana. Take a deep inhalation and with a jump spread the legs apart sideways 4 to 4.5 feet. Raise the arms sideways, in line with the shoulders, palms facing down.
2. While exhaling slowly, tum the right foot sideways 90 degrees to the right, and the left foot slightly to the right, keeping the left leg stretched out and tightened at the knee. Bend the right leg at the knee until the thigh and the calf form a right angle and the right thigh is parallel to the floor.
3. Place the right palm on the floor by the side of the right foot, the right armpit covering and touching the outer side of the right knee. Stretch the left arm out over the left ear. Keep the head up.
4.Tighten the knees and stretch the hamstrings. The chest, the hips and the legs should be in a line and in order to achieve this, move the chest up and back. Stretch every part of the body, concentrating on the back portion of the whole body, specially the spine. Stretch the spine until all the vertebrae and ribs move and there is a feeling that even the skin is being stretched and pulled.
5. Remain in this pose from half a minute to a minute, breathing deeply and evenly. Inhale and lift the right palm from the floor.
6. Inhale, straighten the right leg and raise the arms parallel to the floor.
7. Exhale and turn the left foot sideways 90 degrees, right foot slightly to the left. Repeat the process.
8. Exhale and jump back to Tadasana.

Paschimottanasan

Paschimottanasan

Paschimottanasana is a seated forward bend with the upper body folded forward over the legs. It is one of the 12 basic postures of Hatha yoga and is also part of the Ashtanga primary series.
Paschimottanasana is considered to be a calming posture for the mind and nervous system. It may be therapeutic for anxiety and depression. Because it can be relatively challenging, especially for beginners, it is a good posture for teaching surrender and patience. For those with tight hamstrings, it is only over time and with practice that the body can release and open up into the full forward fold.

Instructions

1. Sit on the floor with the legs stretched straight in front. Place the palms on the floor by the side of the hips. Take a few deep breaths.
2. Exhale, extend the hands and catch the toes. Hold the right big toe between the right thumb and the index fingers and likewise the left big toe.
3. Learn to bend right from the pelvic region of the back and also to extend the arms from the shoulders.
4· Now exhale, bend and widen the elbows, using them as levers, pull the trunk forward and touch the forehead to the knees. Gradually rest the elbows on the floor, stretch the neck and trunk. Touch the knees with the nose and then with the lips.
5. Inhale, raise the head from the knees and relax.
6. One does not feel any weight on the back in correct Paschimot­tanasana

Utthita Trikonasan

Utthita Trikonasan

Uttihita trikonasana is a standing yoga asana that requires balance and flexibility. In this posture, straight legs are spread apart and one foot is at a 90-degree angle. With both arms extended, the body bends toward the lead foot so that one arm reaches toward the ground and the other toward the sky. In addition to a range of physical benefits, uttihita trikonasana is believed to stimulate energy pathways in the body.

The name comes from the Sanskrit utthita, meaning extended, trikona, meaning three corners or triangle, and asana, meaning pose. The term is often used synonymously with trikonasana (triangle pose).

Instructions

1. Stand in Tadasana.
2. Inhale deeply and with a jump spread apart the legs sideways 3 to 3.5 feet. Raise the arms sideways, in line with the shoulders, palms facing down. Keep the arms parallel to the floor.
3. Turn the right foot sideways 90 degrees to the right. Turn the left foot slightly to the right, keeping the left leg stretched from the inside and tightened at the knee.
4. Exhale; bend the trunk sideways to the right, bringing the right palm near the right ankle. If possible, the right palm should rest completely on the floor.
5. Stretch the left arm up, bringing it in line with the right shoulder and extend the trunk. The back of the legs, the back of the chest and the hips should be in a line. Gaze at the thumb of the left hand. Keep the right knee locked tight by pulling up the knee-cap and keep the right knee facing the toes.
6. Remain in this position from half a minute to a minute, breathing deeply and evenly. Then lift the right palm from the floor. Inhale and come up.
7. Now, turn the left foot sideways 90 degrees to the left, turn the right foot slightly to the left, keep both knees tight and continue to do the same process on the left. Inhale and come up. Hold the posture for the same length of time on the left side.
8.Exhale, and jump, coming back to Tadasana.

 

Baddhakonasan on Bolster

Baddhakonasan on Bolster

Baddha konasana is a basic seated asana that opens the hips and the muscles of the groin. The term comes from the Sanskrit baddha, meaning ‘bound,’ kona, meaning ‘angle’ and asana, meaning ‘pose’ or ‘posture.’

This asana is named after the Sanskrit words baddha meaning bound, kona meaning angle or split, and asana meaning posture. Most often, you will find cobblers sitting in this position as they go about their daily chores. So another name for Baddha Konasana is the Cobbler Pose. It is also called the Butterfly Pose as the open hips joined by the feet and the up and down movements resemble the stance of a butterfly in motion. While it is extremely simple, it has a whole lot of benefits to its credit.

Instructions

1. Sit on a bolster at right. angles to your body.
2. Place a block on either side of your hips. Sit in Dandasana.
3. Bend your knees and join both soles together. Pull your heels closer to the bolster.
4. Push your knees away from each other and then gradually onto the blocks.
5. Take your hands behind your back and press your fingertips on the bolster. Open your chest and draw-in the abdomen.
6. Initially, hold the pose for 1 minute. Gradually increase the duration of the asana to 5 minutes.

Gomukhasan

Gomukhasan

Gomukhasana is a seated yoga posture that stretches several parts of the body simultaneously, including the ankles, hips, thighs, shoulders, underarms, triceps and chest. The name comes from the Sanskrit go, meaning cow, mukha, meaning face, and asana, meaning pose.

To perform this asana, the practitioner sits with the spine straight. The knees are bent so that the left foot goes under the right knee, to the outside of the right hip. Then the right leg goes over the left, so that the right knee stacks on top of the left. The right arm is bent and brought behind the back, while the left arm is brought over the left shoulder. The hands attempt to touch behind the back. This process is repeated on the opposite side.

Instructions

1. Sit on the floor with the legs stretched straight in front.
2. Place the palms on the floor and raise the seat.
3. Bend the left knee back and sit on the left foot. Remove the hands from the floor, raise the right leg and place the right thigh over the left one. Raise the buttocks and with the help of the hands bring the ankles and the back of the heels together till they touch each other. Rest the ankles keeping the toes pointing back.
4. Raise the left arm over the head, bend it at the elbow and place the left palm below the nape of the neck between the shoulders. Lower the right arm, bend it at the elbow and raise the right forearm up behind the back until the right hand is level with and between the shoulder-blades. Clasp the hands behind the back between the shoulders.
5. Hold this position from 30 to 60 seconds breathing normally. Keep the neck and head erect and look straight ahead.
6. Unclasp the hands, straighten the legs and repeat the pose on the other side for the same length of time by inserting ‘left’ for ‘right’ and vice versa. Then unclasp the hands at the back, straighten the legs and relax.

 

Shavasan On Bolster

Shavasan On Bolster

Savasana, or shavasana (Śavāsana), is a restorative asana that is a key component of yoga. It usually follows vinyasa or is practiced near the end of a yoga session.

To enter the pose, the body lies face-up on the ground. The legs are comfortably spread and the arms are relaxed alongside the body with the palms facing either up or down.

Instructions

Coming soon.

Bent leg Shavasan on Chair

Bent leg Shavasan on Chair

Savasana, or shavasana (Savasana), is a restorative asana that is a key component of yoga. It usually follows vinyasa or is practiced near the end of a yoga session.

To enter the pose, the body lies face-up on the ground. The legs are comfortably spread and the arms are relaxed alongside the body with the palms facing either up or down.

Instructions

Coming soon.

Breathing exercise : Deep breathing

Breathing exercise : Deep breathing

The video will follow 3 kinds of deep breathing exercises; 4:4. 4:6, 4:8. Deep breathing is the prerequisite for any kind of pranayam. It prepares our lungs to practice further breathing exercises and also helps in increasing their capacity

Instructions

Coming soon.

Breathing exercise: Cleansing breath and Bhramari pranayam

Breathing exercise: Cleansing breath and Bhramari pranayam
Cleansing breath will be done in a ration 4:2:6. Helps to increase the capacity of lungs and brings about a sense of calmness.
Bhramari pranayam has a great effect on your nervous system which helps in positively impacting your mental health. It is also effective for Blood Pressure issues.
Instructions

Coming soon.

Breathing exercise : Kapalbhati pranayam

Breathing exercise : Kapalbhati pranayam

Apart from increasing capacity of the respiratory system, Kapalbhati also helps to increase your metabolic rate.

Instructions

Coming soon.

Breathing exercise : Anulom Vilom

Breathing exercise : Anulom Vilom

Anulom Vilom is said to be the pranayam that stabilizes your mind. This kind of breathing helps to balance both the hemispheres of our brain which brings about peace and overall well-being.

Instructions

Coming soon.

Breathing exercise: Shitli Shitkari

Breathing exercise: Shitli Shitkari
Natural body cooler pranayam. Brings about a cooling effect to your internal organs.
Instructions

Coming soon.

Asana

Asana
    • Supta Baddha Konasana
    • Ustrasana
    • Gomukhasan
    • Dhanurasan

Body movement is just as important as breathing exercises. These asana are chest openers that will essentially help you improve body posture and improve the quality of your breathing by opening the chest cavity all the way.
*These asana can be performed for at least 15 mins. Breathing exercises are to be preferably performed after any kind of exercise or asana.

Instructions

Coming soon.

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