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Isometric Exercise

Isometric Exercises For Strength Training

Air squat

Air squat

The bodyweight squat is a fundamental exercise that strengthens the quads, glutes, and hamstrings.

Instructions:

1. Stand with feet about shoulder width apart.
2. Keeping the core engaged, hips move back and down and descend till they are below the knees
3. Keep knees tracking in line Keep pushing the heels down and keep bodyweight in heels (vs toes)with the toes and don’t let them drop inwards.
4. Begin standing up while trying to keep the torso upright.
5. Finish standing upright with hips and knees fully extended.

Assisted hops

Assisted hops

Hopping is not only an effective aerobic or cardiovascular exercise, but also helps with strengthening the bones and joints over time. This version uses the assistance of one’s arms to reduce the load on the lower body, making at approachable even to beginners

Instructions

1. Stand in front of the platform ( box / table / chair ) with your feet close to each other.
2. Put your palms on the platform and transfer most of your weight onto the arms.
3. While pushing down on the platform, using it’s support perform a hop.
4. Land back on the ground as softly as you can, making contact with thru ball of your foot first, and repeal.

Assisted lunge

Assisted lunge

Lunges allow you to shape and strengthen the lower body, Lunges can be more challenging than squats because the split stance puts you in an unstable position and it puts more pressure on a single leg, as compared to two in a squat. Due to these demands, it is appropriate to develop one’s capacity by using the support of an arm, to achieve full range and correct form.

Instructions

1. Stand in a split stance with one foot forward. The feet should be about 2 to 3 feet apart, depending on your leg length. And a prop next to you to rest your arm on for support.
2. Bend the knees and lower the body down until the back knee is just off the floor. At the bottom of the movement, the front thigh should be parallel to the floor and the back knee should point toward the floor.
3. Push back up, keeping your weight in the heel of the front foot and maintaining an upright torso. Use as little support with the arm as possible.
4. Finish at the top of the split stance.

Assisted sit up

Assisted sit up

The sit up is an exercise to strengthen, tighten and tone the abdominal muscles. The assisted version uses some momentum from the legs to help beginners achieve the exercise and at the same time helps with learning how to fire multiple muscle groups together in compound movements.

Instructions

1. Begin lying on your back, with your knees slightly bent and arms above your head.
2. Brace your abdomen, kick the legs straight and use the momentum produce by this kick to lift the torso off the ground.
3. Complete sitting up by bending forward till the shoulders have crossed the line of the hips and the hands touch the thighs / knees. Keep your chest up and back straight throughout.
4. Lay back down, slow and controlled (vs falling back flat and hard).

Assisted squat

Assisted squat

The assisted squat, helps build the full range of the squat, without putting too much pressure on the lower body, especially the joints, by allowing us to use our arms for support.

Instructions

1. Stand with feet about shoulder width apart.
2. Hold a door or another stable object (table / chair etc) in front to take some off the legs as you move back and down.
3. Keeping the core engaged, hips move back and down and descend till they are below the knees. Use the arms to help maintain an upright torso.
4. Keep knees tracking in line with the toes and don’t let them drop inwards.Keep pushing the heels down and keep bodyweight in heels (vs toes).
5. Begin standing up and use the help of arms as required.
6. Finish standing upright with hips and knees fully extended.

Back scale

Back scale

The front and back scales are gymnastic warm up exercises that are used to strengthen the core and improve balance, flexibility. Both variations of the scale involve balancing on one leg and lifting theother leg out in front or back while keeping your core engaged and arms extended to the side.

Instructions

1. Start standing upright and extend arms on the side, in line with the shoulders
2. Fix your eyes on something stable and keep looking ahead towards it.
3. Shift your weight to one leg and raise the other leg back, simultaneously bending the torso forward from the hip. Keep both legs extended (no bending them)
4. Keep the hips square with the floor.
5. Once the hold is complete, lower the leg back down and finish by standing upright.

Bent over row (double arm)

Bent over row (double arm)

The bent-over row is a exercise used to build strength and muscle in both the lower and upper back. It targets nearly all of the muscles in the back, but particularly the last, rhomboids, and lower back.

Instructions

1. Keeping feet at hip width distance, pick up the weight with a grip just wider than shoulders and palms facing down.
2. Hinge forward with a flat back till the chest is facing the floor.
3. Pull the weight to touch the abs, making sure the elbows stay close and travel back.
4. Lower the weight back down till arms are straight and repeat.

Bent over row (single arm)

Bent over row (single arm)

The single arm version of the bent over row, is an exercise that along with building muscles of the back, also helps build balance between the left and right, while requiring more engagement of the core for stability.

Instructions

1. Keeping feet at hip width distance, pick up the weight with a straight back
2. Hinge forward with a flat back till the chest is facing the floor.
3. Pull the weight to touch the abs, making sure the elbow stays close to the ribs and travels back.
4. Lower the weight back down till arm is straight and repeat.

Burpee (stepping)

Burpee (stepping)

The burped is an exercise used as a strengthening tool as well as an aerobic exercise, in the simplest form, it involves lying down on the ground and standing back up but can include forms of a squat and a push up in doing so. It is an important skill to have to remain functional especially with older populations. This variation avoids the pressing and jumping components, thus reducing the load on the arms and any impact on the knees or ankles.

Instructions

1. Stand with your feet shoulder-width apart and your arms at your sides.
2. Bend forward, place your hands on the ground just in front of your feet, shift your weight into the arms and step back one leg at a time and get into a high plank position. Keep legs straight, shoulders just above the wrists.
3. Stepping forward, one leg at a time shift the weight back to the feet and stand upright.

Burpee step over

Burpee step over

The burpee step over combines the movement of lying down and pressing yourself up, with a lateral movement component, further challenging coordination and balance, though it is primarily an aerobic exercise.

Instructions

1. Stand next to the bag or object being used, with your feet shoulder-width apart and your arms at your sides.
2. Bend forward, place your hands on the ground just in front of your feet, shift your weight into the arms and jump the feet back to land into a high plank position. Keep legs straight, shoulders just above the wrists.
3. Drop the whole body down to the floor, keeping palms next to your chest and elbows close to the ribs.
4. Begin pressing up, straighten the arms and then jump both feet forward to the starting position, trying to keep hips as high as possible.
5. Shift the weight back to the feet, stand upright and finish by stepping over the object side ways, perform the next repetition on this side of the object.

Weighted sit to stand

Weighted sit to stand

Once we can perform a sit to stand comfortably, with good form, a greater challenge may be added to the movement by holding a weight, this makes us stay more active through the move and develop strength before we can move away from the chair / prop that we have been sitting on.

Instructions

1. Stand with feet about shoulder width apart.
2. Hold a weight in a vertical position directly in front of the chest. Keep the elbows close to the rib cage and the back straight.
3. Keeping the core engaged, send hips back and down and descend till you reach the chair / object. Sit but do not relax completely.
4. Keep knees tracking in line with the toes and don’t let them drop inwards. Keep pushing the heels down and keep bodyweight in heels (vs. toes)
5. Begin standing up while trying to keep the torso upright.
6. Finish standing upright with hips and knees fully extended.

Counterbalance squat

Counterbalance squat

The counterbalance squat is a great tool do develop lower body strength and simultaneously improve body control by putting our torso in a better position at the bottom of a squat.

Instructions

1. Stand with feet about shoulder width apart.
2. Hold a weight in a vertical position directly in front of the chest. Keep the elbows close to the rib cage and the back straight.
3. Keeping the core engaged, hips move back and down at the same time the arms press away from the body, the counterweight helps maintain an upright torso. Descend till the hips are below the knees.
4. Keep knees tracking in line with the toes and don’t let them drop inwards. Keep pushing the heels down and keep bodyweight in heels (vs toes)
5. Begin standing up and bring the weight and elbows back close to the chest and ribs.
6. Finish standing upright with hips and knees fully extended.

Goblet squat (backpack)

Goblet squat (backpack)

The goblet squat is a popular lower-body exercise where you hold a kettle bell or dumbbell in front of your chest as if you are supporting a heavy cup or goblet. It can help improve the squat technique and hip mobility.

Instructions

1. Stand with feet about shoulder width apart.
2. Hold a weight in a vertical position directly in front of the chest. Keep the elbows close to the rib cage and the back straight.
3. Keeping the core engaged, hips move back and down and descend till the hips are below the knees.
4. Keep knees tracking in line with the toes and don’t let them drop inwards. Keep pushing the heels down and keep bodyweight in heels (vs toes)
5. Begin standing up while trying to keep the torso upright.
6. Finish standing upright with hips and knees fully extended.

Overhead squat (backpack)

Overhead squat (backpack)

The overhead squat is a total-body squatting movement that can increase upper back, shoulder, and core strength, while also reinforcing proper squatting technique.

Instructions

1. Stand with feet about shoulder width apart.
2. Hold the weight overhead with arms wide enough so as to have the weight about 6 inches away from the head.
3. Keeping the core engaged, shoulders actively pressing the weight overhead, hips move back and down and descend till the hips are below the knees.
4. Keep knees tracking in line with the toes and don’t let them drop inwards. Keep pushing the heels down and keep bodyweight in heels (vs toes)
5. Begin standing up while trying to keep the torso upright and pressing the weight up towards the roof.
6. Finish standing upright with hips and knees fully extended.

Static lunge

Static lunge

Lunges are a powerful exercise, allowing you to shape and strengthen almost every muscle in the lower body—the hips, gluts, quads, hamstrings, and calves. Lunges can be more challenging than squats because the split stance puts you in an unstable position, which challenges your balance.

Instructions

1. Stand in a split stance with one foot forward. The feet should be about 2 to 3 feet apart, depending on your leg length.
2. Bend the knees and lower the body down until the back knee is just off the floor. At the bottom of the movement, the front thigh should be parallel to the floor and the back knee should point toward the floor.
3. Push back up, keeping your weight in the heel of the front foot and maintaining an upright torso.
4. Finish at the top of the split stance.

Forward lunge

Forward lunge

The bodyweight forward Lunge is a variation/modification of the static lunge. In this variation, you start each rep standing upright with feet slightly apart and take a step forward.

Instructions

1. Start standing upright with feet slightly apart and take a long step forward.
2. Once your feet are about 3 feet apart, Bend the knees and lower the body down until the back knee is just off the floor. At the bottom of the movement, the front thigh should be parallel to the floor and the back knee should point toward the floor.
3. Push back up, keeping your weight in the heel of the front foot and maintaining an upright torso, as you reach the top of the split stance, step back.
4. Finish standing upright with feet slightly apart, next to each other. Start with the other leg for the next repetition.

Rverse lunge

Rverse lunge

The forward Lunge is a variation/modification of the static lunge. In this variation, you start each rep standing upright with feet slightly apart and take a long step back to reach a split stance; this change of direction can be a great way to challenge your coordination.

Instructions

1. Start standing upright with feet slightly apart and take a long step back.
2. Once your feet are about 3 feet apart, Bend the knees and lower the body down until the back knee is just off the floor. At the bottom of the movement, the front thigh should be parallel to the floor and the back knee should point toward the floor.
3. Push back up, keep your weight in the heel of the front foot and maintaining an upright torso, as you reach the top of the split stance, bring the foot ahead.
4. Finish standing upright with feet slightly apart, next to each other. Start with the other leg for the next repetition.

Dum bell lunge (suitcase)

Dum bell lunge (suitcase)

The lunge while holding a weight on our side in the low position like were holding a bag or suitcase, brings with it the challenge of controlling an extra weight that is off center and to be able to do a lunge while holding it in position.

Instructions

1. Start standing upright with feet slightly apart, hold the weight by your side and then take a long step forward
2. Once your feet are about 3 feet apart, Bend the knees and lower the body down until the back knee is just off the floor. At the bottom of the movement, the front thigh should be parallel to the floor and the back knee should point toward the floor.
3. Push back up, keeping your weight in the heel of the front foot and maintaining an upright torso, as you reach the top of the split stance, step back.
4. Finish standing upright with feet slightly apart, next to each other. Start with the other leg for the next repetition.

Front Rack lunge (alternating)

Front Rack lunge (alternating)

The front rack position greatly challenges upper back flexibility while also demanding the core to remain engaged while you perform a lunge to strengthen the lower body.

Instructions

1. Start standing upright with feet slightly apart; hold the weight in a front rack position, with the elbows pointing in the front and the weight resting on your collar bones. Then, take a long step forward.
2. Once your feet are about 3 feet apart, Bend the knees and lower the body down until the back knee is just off the floor. At the bottom of the movement, the front thigh should be parallel to the floor and the back knee should point toward the floor.
3. Push back up, keeping your weight in the heel of the front foot and maintaining an upright torso with the elbows pointing forwards throughout. As you reach the top of the split stance, step back.
4. Finish standing upright with feet slightly apart, next to each other. Start with the other leg for the next repetition.

Goblet lunge (alternating)

Goblet lunge (alternating)

For the goblet lunge you hold a weight (dumbbell) vertical, in front of your chest as if you are supporting a heavy cup or goblet, however Your start and end the movement with both feet in line, next to each other. It should only be attempted after the free lunge can be completed with ease.

Instructions

1. Start standing upright with feet slightly apart, hold the weight near your chest, with the elbows near your ribs. Then, take a long step forward.
2. Once your feet are about 3 feet apart, Bend the knees and lower the body down until the back knee is just off the floor. At the bottom of the movement, the front thigh should be parallel to the floor and the back knee should point toward the floor.
3. Push back up, keeping your weight in the heel of the front foot and maintaining an upright torso. As you reach the top of the split stance, step back.
4. Finish standing upright with feet slightly apart, next to each other. Start with the other leg for the next repetition.

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